RabbitMQ and Excel

RabbitMQ is one of the most popular messaging queue systems out there. If you’re a programmer there are client packages available for almost of the programming languages. However if you’re not a programmer your choices are limited in trying to interact with RabbitMQ.

In this blog I wanted to document some of my work in using Excel to read and write messages from RabbitMQ.

Getting Started

There are some great RabbitMQ guides. To get Excel talking to RabbitMQ I used the REST API that will be need to be installed.

For my Excel work I used Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) that is launched by Alt-F11. Next I created a Module (this is a container for VBA code), and I created two functions:

  • RMQ_getqueue – to get the first value in a queue
  • RMQ_exchangeWrite – to write a value to an exchange  (note: if an exchange has a binding to a queue. Writing to an exchange will be also be writing to a queue).

VBA_insert_module

Read Message Queues

For my example I focused on getting the first item in a queue. Message in a queue can be cleared as they are read if the option requeue = False.

 Function RMQ_getqueue(RabbitMQ_Server As String, QueueName As String, Optional rmq_user As String, Optional rmq_pswd As String, Optional requeue As Boolean)  
 ' Create a REST API get request to a Rabbitmq server and get the first item in a queue  
   Dim theJSON As Object, http As Object, scriptControl As Object  
   Dim theurl As String, theparams As String, rqmsg As String  
   Set http = CreateObject("MSXML2.XMLHTTP")  
 ' Use a Jscript eval command to evaluate the JSON, (so you don't have to add a JSON component  
   Set scriptControl = CreateObject("MSScriptControl.ScriptControl")  
   scriptControl.Language = "JScript"  
     
   theurl = "http://" & RabbitMQ_Server & "/api/queues/%2f/" & QueueName + "/get"  
    
 ' define a parameter list this must be JSON and the synax is pickie  
   If IsMissing(requeue) Then requeue = True  
   theparams = "{""count"":1,""requeue"":""" & LCase(requeue) & """,""encoding"":""auto"",""truncate"":50000}"  
   'Debug.Print theparams  
     
   http.Open "POST", theurl, False, rmq_user, rmq_pswd  
   http.setRequestHeader "Content-type", "application/xml"  
   http.send (theparams)  
 ' create a simple JSON string  
   thestr = Mid(http.responseText, 2, Len(http.responseText) - 2)  
   Set theJSON = scriptControl.Eval("(" & thestr & ")")  
   'Debug.Print http.responseText  
   
   RMQ_getqueue = theJSON.payload  
 End Function  

The RMQ_getqueue function creates a URL string that is passed to the http request object. The RabbitMQ response text is JSON formatted. I didn’t want to load external JSON addins so I used the ScriptControl with a Javascript eval function to parse the JSON. The payload item of the response is the first message in the queue.

To use this new function in Excel select the category “User Defined”.

Excel_insert_function

Then fill in the parameters as per your requirement.

Excel_rmq_get

Write a Message to an Exchange

As mentioned earlier you can’t write directly to a queue with the REST API instead you write to an exchange. The exchange has a routing key that “binds” a messages to a queue.

Like the get queue function the RMQ_exchangeWrite function formats a URL with all the required parameters.

 Function RMQ_exchangeWrite(RabbitMQ_Server As String, ExchangeName As String, RouteKey As String, theMessage As String, Optional rmq_user As String, Optional rmq_pswd As String)  
 ' Create a REST API post a new message to a Rabbitmq Exchange with a Routing Key  
   Dim http As Object  
   Dim theurl As String, theparams As String  
   Set http = CreateObject("MSXML2.XMLHTTP")  
     
   theurl = "http://" & RabbitMQ_Server & "/api/exchanges/%2f/" & ExchangeName + "/publish"  
    
 ' define a parameter list this must be JSON and the synax is pickie  
   theparams = "{""properties"":{},""routing_key"":""" & RouteKey & """,""payload"":""" & theMessage & """,""payload_encoding"":""string""}"  
     
   Debug.Print theparams  
     
   http.Open "POST", theurl, False, rmq_user, rmq_pswd  
   http.setRequestHeader "Content-type", "application/xml"  
   http.send (theparams)  
   
   'Debug.Print http.responseText  
   
   RMQ_exchangeWrite = http.statusText & " " & http.responseText  
 End Function  

Like the earlier function, fill in all the parameter as per your system.

Excel_rmq_write

Final Comments

This was an introductory project, and there are still a lot of features and error checking that should be included.

If I had more time I would put some dialogs in to dynamically show queues, exchanges etc.

RabbitMQ REST API

RabbitMQ is an open source middleware message solution that natively uses AMQP communications but it has a good selection of plug-ins to support features like: MQTT, MQTT Web Sockets, HTTP REST API and server-to-server communications.

rabbitmq_overview

RabbitMQ has a very good selection of interfacing clients for most of the major programming languages. For applications where there is no custom programming library the REST API can be used.

Applications where the REST API could be used might include:

  • Arduino IoT projects
  • Web Clients (not using NodeJS)
    • For simple reading and writing of messages
    • For monitoring of RabbitMQ loading
  • AppInventor Android apps

Unfortunately I didn’t find the RabbitMQ REST API to be 100% straightforward, so in this blog I could like to document some of my notes and testing.

What is REST API

Representational State Transfer (REST) is a software style for creating Web services. A client issues an HTTP request to a server with a GET/POST/PUT or DELETE method and the server responds with a JSON (Javascript Object Notation) formatted message.

RESTAPI_overview

The most common tool to test REST API is curl. Curl is supported on all major OS’s. The curl syntax will vary slightly between Windows and Linux, especially in how the systems handle strings.

RabbitMQ Setup

RabbitMQ can be installed on Window, Linux, MacOS systems and there are also some cloud based offerings. For small systems lower end hardware like a Raspberry Pi can be used.  For complete RabbitMQ installation instructions see: https://www.rabbitmq.com/download.html . To install and run RabbitMQ on a Ubuntu system enter:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install rabbitmq-server
sudo service rabbitmq-server start

The next step is to add some plug-ins. For the Web Administration and REST API plug-ins:

sudo rabbitmq-plugins enable rabbitmq-management

The rabbitmqctl command line tool allows you to configure and review the RabbitMQ server. To add a user pete,  with password pete, that has config, write and read rights for management and administrator access, enter:

sudo rabbitmqctl add_user pete pete
sudo rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p / pete ".*" ".*" ".*"
sudo rabbitmqctl set_user_tags pete management administrator

After you’ve defined an administrative user the RabbitMQ web management plug-in can be accessed by: http://ip_address:15672 .

Rabbit_webadmin

Once the Web Management component is installed it is much easier to test and play with REST API calls.

REST API Calls Using CURL

For a complete set of RabbitMQ REST API calls see: https://pulse.mozilla.org/api/ .

Typically you would use the RabbitMQ tools to create and exchanges and queues but it is possible to do this via the REST API interface.

Below are some examples using user: pete and a password of pete . Note: %2f is used for default (blank name) virtual host.

Create an exchange: webex

curl -i -u pete:pete -H “content-type:application/json” -X PUT http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/exchanges/%2f/webex -d”{“”type””:””direct””,””auto_delete””:false,””durable””:true,””internal””:false,””arguments””:{}}”

Create a Queue: webq1

curl -i -u pete:pete -H “content-type:application/json” -X PUT http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/queues/%2f/webq1 -d”{“”auto_delete””:false,””durable””:true,””arguments””:{}}”

Create Binding: Bind queue webq1 to exchange webex with a routing key of webq1

curl -i -u pete:pete -H “content-type:application/json” -X POST http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/bindings/%2f/e/webex/q/webq1 -d”{“”routing_key””:””webq1“”,””arguments””:{}}”

Comments: you need to bind a queue to an exchange if you wish to write to it. The routing key does the binding. The key can be any name but using the queue name makes it simple. A queue can also have binding to multiple exchanges.

Get a message: from queue webq1

curl -i -u pete:pete -H “content-type:application/json” -X POST http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/queues/%2f/webq1/get -d”{“”count””:5,””requeue””:true,””encoding””:””auto””,””truncate””:50000}”

Comments: A queue can have multiple messages. A requeue=false, will remove messages that are already read.

Post a message (44.4) : to exchange webex with routing key webq1

curl -i -u pete:pete -H “content-type:application/json” -X POST http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/exchanges/%2f/webex/publish -d”{“”properties””:{},””routing_key””:””webq1“”,””payload””:””44.4“”,””payload_encoding””:””string””}”

 

Javascript REST API Client

I had some Web browser issues when my test PC and my RabbitMQ server were in different domains. Web Browsers like Chrome and  Firefox will complain about a CORS policy problem.

Cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) is a mechanism that allows restricted resources on a web page to be requested from another domain outside the domain from which the first resource was served.

If you are crossing domains and you want to do some quick testing Microsoft Explorer will work.

Javascript GET a Queue Message

I used the AJAX XMLHttpRequest object to do my GET and POST requests.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<h2>RabbitMQ REST API - Get Queue Message</h2>

URL/API Call: <input type="text" id="theurl" value="http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/queues/%2f/"  size = "50" /> <br><br>
Queue Name:   <input type="text" id="qname" value="webex"/> <br><br>
Requeue: <input type="text" id="rq" value="true" /> (false = remove old values)<br><br>
Message Count: <input type="text" id="mcount" value="5"/> <br><br>
<button type="button" onclick="sendoutput()">Get Message(s)</button>
<br>

<hr>
<p id="demo"></p>

<script>
function sendoutput() {
	// RabbitMQ username and password
	var username = "pete";
	var password = "pete";
	var xhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
	
    var fullurl = document.getElementById("theurl").value + document.getElementById("qname").value + "//get";
	
	xhttp.open("POST", fullurl, true,username,password);
	
	// change to your Auth username and password

	xhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-Type","application/jsonp");

	var rq = document.getElementById("rq").value;
	var mcount = document.getElementById("mcount").value;
	var params = JSON.stringify({"count":mcount,"requeue":rq,"encoding":"auto","truncate":"50000"});
	// Define a handler function when the response comes back
	xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
		// Get the response and put on it the screen
		if (this.readyState == 4 ) {	
			document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = "Result=" +xhttp.responseText;
		}
	}

	xhttp.send(params);
}

</script>
</body>
</html>

r_get

Javascript POST an Exchange Message

Unfortunately you can not send a message directly to a queue, instead you need to send a message to an exchange with routing key. This routing key is linked to the queue that you wish to connect to.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<h2>RabbitMQ REST API - An Exchange Message</h2>

URL/API Call: <input type="text" id="theurl" value="http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/exchanges/%2f/"  size = "50" /> <br><br>
Exchange Name:   <input type="text" id="exname" value="webex"/> <br><br>
Routing Key:   <input type="text" id="rkey" value="webq1"/> <br><br>
Value to Send:   <input type="text" id="theval" value="11.1"/> <br><br>

<button type="button" onclick="sendoutput()">Send Output</button>
<br>

<hr>
<p id="demo"></p>

<script>
function sendoutput() {
	// RabbitMQ username and password
	var username = "pete"; 
	var password = "pete";  
	
	var xhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
	
	var fullurl = document.getElementById("theurl").value + document.getElementById("exname").value + "//publish";
	
	xhttp.open("POST", fullurl, true,username,password);

	xhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-Type","application/jsonp");
	
	var rkey = document.getElementById("r").value
	var theval = document.getElementById("theval").value
	var params = JSON.stringify({"properties":{},"routing_key":rkey,"payload":theval,"payload_encoding":"string"});
	
	// Define a handler function when the response comes back
	xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
		// Get the response and put on it the screen
		if (this.readyState == 4 ) {	
			document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = "Result=" +xhttp.responseText;
		}
	}
	xhttp.send(params);
}
</script>
</body>
</html>

r_post

Python – get message(s) from a queue

The requests library is extremely simple to use for REST interfacing. It is installed by:

pip install requests

# importing the requests library
import requests

# defining the api-endpoint
API_ENDPOINT = "http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/queues/%2f/webq1/get"

headers = {'content-type': 'application/json'}
# data to be sent to api
pdata = {'count':'5','requeue':'true','encoding':'auto','truncate':'50000'}

# sending post request and saving response as response object
r = requests.post(url = API_ENDPOINT ,auth=('pete', 'pete'), json = pdata, headers=headers)

# extracting response text
pastebin_url = r.text
print("Response :%s"%pastebin_url)

Python – Write a message to an exchange


# importing the requests library
import requests
import json

# defining the api-endpoint
API_ENDPOINT = "http://192.168.0.116:15672/api/exchanges/%2f/webex/publish"

# your source code here

headers = {'content-type': 'application/json'}
# data to be sent to api

pdata = {'properties':{},'routing_key':'webq1','payload':'90.4','payload_encoding':'string'}

# sending post request and saving response as response object
r = requests.post(url = API_ENDPOINT ,auth=('pete', 'pete'), json = pdata, headers=headers)

# extracting response text
pastebin_url = r.text
print("Response :%s"%pastebin_url)

Final Comments

The RabbitMQ REST interface is not designed for high throughput, but it is an excellent way to connect devices that have no native API support.

For my next round of testing I’d like to work on an Arduino and a AppInventor Android app.

RabbitMQ for IoT

For Internet of Things (IoT) projects that are a lot of different ways that the sensors, devices and client interfaces can be connected together. For many projects using simple MQTT (Message Queue Telemetry Transport) is all that you need. However if you’re trying to merge and build IoT projects that use both MQTT and AMQP (Advanced Message Queue Protocol) or require a REST API then you should take a look at RabbitMQ.

RabbitMQ is an open source middleware solution that natively uses AMQP communications but it has a good selection of plug-ins to support features like: MQTT, MQTT Web Sockets, HTTP REST API and server-to-server communications.

rabbitmq_overview

In this blog we will setting up a RabbitMQ server, and we will look at some of the differences between MQTT and AMQP messaging. Finally an example of an Anduino MQTT message will be presented as both an MQTT and an AMQP item in a Node-Red dashboard.

Getting Started

RabbitMQ can be installed on Window, Linux, MacOS systems and there are also some cloud based offerings. For small systems lower end hardware like a Raspberry Pi can be used.  For complete RabbitMQ installation instructions see: https://www.rabbitmq.com/download.html . To install and run RabbitMQ on a Ubuntu system enter:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install rabbitmq-server
sudo service rabbitmq-server start

The next step is to add some plug-ins. For my project I loaded the MQTT and Web Administration plug-ins:

sudo rabbitmq-plugins enable rabbitmq_mqtt
sudo rabbitmq-plugins enable rabbitmq-management

The rabbitmqctl command line tool allows you to configure and review the RabbitMQ server. To add a user admin1,  with password admin1, that has config, write and read rights for management and administrator access, enter:

sudo rabbitmqctl add_user admin1 admin1
sudo rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p / admin1 ".*" ".*" ".*"
sudo rabbitmqctl set_user_tags admin1 management administrator

After you’ve defined an administrative user the RabbitMQ web management plug-in can be accessed by: http://ip_address:15672 .

Rabbit_webadmin

The RabbitMQ Web Management tool offers an overview of the present system load, connections, exchanges and queues. 

The RabbitMQ Web Management tool is excellent for small manual changes, if however you are looking a doing a large number of additions or changes then, rabbitmqadmin, the command line management tool can be used. This tool is  installed by:

# Get the cli and make it available to use.
wget http://127.0.0.1:15672/cli/rabbitmqadmin
sudo chmod +x rabbitmqadmin

Comparing MQTT and AMQP

It’s useful to comment about some of the differences between MQTT (Message Queue Telemetry Transport) and AMQP (Advanced Message Queueing Protocol) .

MQTT is a light weight publish-subscribe-based messaging protocol that works well with lower end hardware and limited bandwidth. For Arduino type applications where you only need to pass some sensor data MQTT is an excellent fit.

AMQP has more overhead than MQTT, because it is a more advanced protocol that includes message orientation, queuing, routing, reliability and security. Presently there are no mainstream AMQP Arduino libraries, but numerous programming options for Raspberry Pi, Linux, Windows and MacOS systems exist.  An AMQP IoT example would be to send sensor failures and alarms to dedicated maintenance and alarm queues.

MQTT and AMQP Queues

One of the biggest differences in queues is that MQTT queues are designed to show you the last available message, where as AMQP will store multiple messages in a queue.

A published MQTT message contains a message body, a retain flag and a quality of service (QoS) value.

An AMQP message can be published with added properties such as: time stamp, type of message and expiration information. AMQP messages also support the addition of custom header values. Below is a Python publish example that defines the message type to be “Pi Sensor”, and custom headers are include for status and alarm state.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import pika

node = "192.168.0.121"
user = "pete"
pwd = "pete"

# Connect to a remote AMQP server with a username/password
credentials = pika.PlainCredentials(user, pwd)
connection = pika.BlockingConnection(pika.ConnectionParameters(node,
        5672, '/', credentials))                                    
channel = connection.channel()

# Create a queue if it doesn't already exist
channel.queue_declare(queue='Rasp_1',durable=True)

# Define the properties and publish a message
props = pika.BasicProperties(
    headers= {'status': 'Good Quality',"alarm":"HI"},
    type ="Pi Sensor")
channel.basic_publish(exchange='',
    routing_key='Rasp_1',body='99.5', properties = props)

connection.close()

For this example the Rasp_1 queue can be examined using the Queue->Get Message option in the Web Management Interface. 

q_prop

RabbitMQ Messaging

There are a variety of ways that AMQP messages can be published and subscribed to. The simplest way is to create a queue and then messages can be published and subscribed to from that queue.

rabbitmq_layoutTo help with the distribution and filtering of messages AMQP supports a number of different exchange types. Messages in an exchange use bindings based on a routing key to link them to a queue. 

The main types of exchanges are: direct, fanout, headers and topic. An IoT example of a direct exchange would be if a group of Raspberry Pi sensor values are going into a “Rasp Pi Sensor” exchange. When the Rasp Pi publishes a sensor result to the exchange the message also includes a routing key to link the message to the correct queue.

direct

An IoT example of a fanout exchange would be with critical sensor failures. The sensor failure message is sent to Bill’s and Sam’s work or task queue and the All Maintenance point queue at the same time.

fanout

Connecting MQTT

After the MQTT plug-in is installed RabbitMQ can act like a standalone MQTT broker. MQTT data can also be made available through an AMQP subscription by binding the MQTT exchange to a RabbitMQ queue.

For an MQTT project any ESP8266 supported Arduino hardware can be used. There are a number of MQTT Arduino libraries that are available. For this project I used the PubSubClient that can be installed using the Arduino Library Manager.

As a test project I used at low cost MQ-2 Combustible Gas Sensor ($3) that measures a combination of LPG, Alcohol, Propane, Hydrogen, CO and even methane. Note to fully use this sensor some calibration is required. On the MQ-2 sensor the analog signal is connected to Arduino pin A0 and the analogRead(thePin) function is used to read the sensor value.

MPq2_Setup.png

Below is some example Arduino code required to read the MQ2 gas sensor and publish it to the RabbitMQ MQTT broker with a topic name of : mq2_mqtt.

/*
 Basic ESP8266 MQTT publish client example
*/
#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>
#include <PubSubClient.h>

// Update these with values suitable for your network.
const char* ssid = "your_ssid";
const char* password = "your_password";
const char* mqtt_server = "192.168.0.121"; 
const char* mqtt_user = "admin1";
const char* mqtt_pass= "admin1";

const int mq2pin = A0; //the MQ2 analog input pin

WiFiClient espClient;
PubSubClient client(espClient);

void setup_wifi() {
  // Connecting to a WiFi network
  WiFi.begin(ssid, password);
  while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
    delay(500);
    Serial.print(".");
  }
  Serial.println("WiFi connected");
  Serial.println("IP address: ");
  Serial.println(WiFi.localIP());
}

void reconnect() {
  // Loop until we're reconnected
  Serial.println("In reconnect...");
  while (!client.connected()) {
    Serial.print("Attempting MQTT connection...");
    // Attempt to connect
    if (client.connect("Arduino_Gas", mqtt_user, mqtt_pass)) {
      Serial.println("connected");
    } else {
      Serial.print("failed, rc=");
      Serial.print(client.state());
      Serial.println(" try again in 5 seconds");
      delay(5000);
    }
  }
}

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  setup_wifi();
  client.setServer(mqtt_server, 1883);
}

void loop() {
  char msg[8];
  if (!client.connected()) {
    reconnect();
  }

  sprintf(msg,"%i",analogRead(mq2pin));
  client.publish("mq2_mqtt", msg);
  Serial.print("MQ2 gas value:");
  Serial.println(msg);

  delay(5000);
}

Once the MQTT value is published any MQTT client can subscribe to it.  Below is a Python MQTT subscribe example.

# mqtt_sub.py - Python MQTT subscribe example 
#
import paho.mqtt.client as mqtt
 
def on_connect(client, userdata, flags, rc):
    print("Connected to broker")
 
def on_message(client, userdata, message):
    print ("Message received: "  + message.payload)

client = mqtt.Client()
client.username_pw_set("admin1", password='admin1')
client.connect("192.168.0.121", 1883) 

client.on_connect = on_connect       #attach function to callback
client.on_message = on_message       #attach function to callback

client.subscribe("mq2_mqtt") 
client.loop_forever()                 #start the loop

Read MQTT Messages Using AMQP

MQTT clients can subscribe to MQTT messages directly or it’s possible to configure RabbitMQ to have the MQTT data accessible as AMQP. The routing of MQTT messages to AMQP queues is done using the direct exchange method.

mqtt_2_amqp

To configure RabbitMQ to forward MQTT the following steps are done:

  1. Create a new RabbitMQ Queue – For an IoT project this would typically be a 1-to-1 mapping of the MQTT topic to a queue name.
  2. Create a binding between the MQTT Exchange and the Queue – by default all the MQTT topic go into the amq.topic exchange. For MQTT items in this exchange a binding, typically the MQTT topic name, is used as the routing key to the AMQP queue.

These steps can be done in a number of ways : manually, in the RabbitMQ config file, using the rabbitmqadmin command line tool or via a program. Because I was doing this for multiple signals I used rabbitmqadmin tool, and the syntax is:

./rabbitmqadmin declare queue name=mq2_amqp durable=true
./rabbitmqadmin declare binding source=amq.topic destination_type=queue destination=mq2_amqp routing_key=mq2_mqtt

The RabbitMQ Web Admin can be used to verify the exchange to queue binding.

wp_mqtt_2_amqp

 

The CLI tool can also be used to see if there are any values in the queue:

cli_get_queue

Node-Red Dashboard

Node-Red is a visual programming environment that allows users to create applications by dragging and dropping nodes on the screen. Logic flows are then created by connecting the different nodes together.

Node-Red has been preinstalled on Raspbian Jesse since the November 2015. Node-Red can also be installed on Windows, Linux and OSX.  To install and run Node-Red on your specific system see https://nodered.org/docs/getting-started/installation.

To install the AMQP components, select the Manage palette option from the right side of the menu bar. Then search for “AMQP” and install node-red-contrib-amqp. If your installation of Node-Red does not have dashboards installed, search for: node-red-dashboard.

nr_install_amqp

For our Node-Red MQTT and AMQP example we will use a mqtt and a amqp node from the input palette group, and two gauge nodes from the dashboard group.  The complete Node-Red logic for this is done in only 4 nodes!

nr_logic

Nodes are added by dragging and dropped them into the center Flow sheet. Logic is created by making connection wires between inputs and output of a node. After the logic is laid out, double click on each of the nodes to configure their specific properties. You will need to specify the MQTT and AMQP definitions of your RabbitMQ IP address,user rights, MQTT topic and AMQP queue name. You will also need to double click on the gauge nodes to configure the look-and-feel of the web dashboard.

After the logic is complete, hit the Deploy button on the right side of the menu bar to run the logic.  The Node-Red dashboard user interface is accessed by: http://ipaddress:1880/ui. 

For my project I used a number of different MQ sensors and inputs. Below is a picture of Node-Red web dashboard that we created with the same MQTT value being shown natively and as a AMQP queued value.

project

Final Comments

I found that RabbitMQ was easy to install and the Web Administration plug-in along with the rabbitmqadmin command line tool made it very easy to maintain. 

If you’re just looking to show sensor values then a basic MQTT broker might be all you need. However if you’re looking at some future applications like alarm, maintenance or task lists then AMQP exchanges and queue make RabbitMQ an interesting option.

More on RabbitMQ:

RabbitMQ REST API – remote interfacing (Javascript and Python examples)

RabbitMQ connections with Excel